Artediparken – home of the tamed beast ODjur

Foto Ana Vera Burin Barata
Near Årummet is a small park that was previously a car park. Today, it is the home of a small bronze animal that enjoys beautiful music.
Address: Artediparken, Västra strandgatan, Uppsala
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Near Årummet is a small park that was previously a car park. Today, it is the home of a small bronze animal that enjoys beautiful music.

The highly talented Peter Artedi was one of Linnaeus’ closest friends while studying in Uppsala. Artedi is thought to have been very significant in Linnaeus’ development. They had many intense discussions about plants, rocks and animals. They divided the plant and animal kingdoms between them, and promised eternal mutual friendship – and that should one die before the other, the survivor would publish the other’s scientific work.

Drowned among the fishes
For a while, both Linnaeus and Artedi lived in the Netherlands, at the time one of Europe’s scientific centres. One evening, Artedi fell into one of Amsterdam’s canals and drowned. The grieving Linnaeus kept his promise, and published Artedi’s manuscript in his specialist field, fish. Artedi’s achievements have drifted into obscurity over the centuries. Naming the park after him has helped in keeping his name prominent.

With a choir as its neighbour

Artediparken is located near Årummet next to the grand KFUM-borgen, the home of one of Sweden’s most famous male choirs, Orphei Drängar (OD). So here you will find Orphei Drängars plats, and the little “ODjuret”, a bronze sculpture by artist Catherine Uppsala Sundkvist Zohari. ODjuret is inspired by Greek myths that recount how the legendary musician Orpheus played so beautifully that wild animals became tame.